Home > Great Big Greenhouse Blog > July 2015 > GARDEN TALK with DOUG - AUGUST GARDENING CHORES

GARDEN TALK with DOUG - AUGUST GARDENING CHORES

As we head into August we have been blessed with ample rainfall and tolerable temperatures that has allowed our plants and lawns to be less stressed.
                Here is a short list of key gardening chores for the month of August:
  1.  August is a key month in planning your fall lawn renovation.  I would strongly urge everyone to have a complete soil analysis done now.  With this information you will be smarter as to what you need to do for a good, healthy lawn starting in September.
  2. August is a great time for saving basil for winter use, as well as for maintaining healthy plants until our first fall frost.  Basil will begin to flower.  Do not allow this to happen.  Cut the basil back which will stimulate new growth.  Take your picked basil leaves and freeze for winter use.  Donna and I have been making pesto and freezing in ice cube trays.  Then, we will pull out a cube or two of pesto and use.  Nothing better than homemade “fresh” pesto in the winter!
  3. August is the month to aerate your lawn.  I recommend core aeration.  Core aeration is when the aerator pulls out a plug of soil.  Aeration will loosen the compaction of the soil.  Also, if your soil test indicates an acidic soil, then now is the time to apply an application of fast acting lime in order to raise the pH level of your soil.
  4. Pulling out plants that have gone past their prime is an important method of preventing a build-up of disease and insect problems.  Plants suspected of virus and fungal diseases should be removed and tossed in the trash (DO NOT COMPOST!!).  The longer they are left lying around in the garden, the greater the chance for carrying over problems to next year.
  5. August is the time to start your cool crop vegetables, such as lettuce, spinach, peas, carrots, and others.    Be creative  -  cool season veggies can be integrated into your landscape beds for interesting color and texture.  Lettuce varieties, for example, can be quite ornamental with their variable shapes and colors.  Also, consider blending purple cabbage, swiss chard, or attractive greens, like bok choy, into your garden beds.  Just be creative and find the room to plant some veggies and enjoy the bounty!
Posted: 7/30/2015 by Doug Hensel | with 1 comment(s)
Comments
linda haer
What is the best way to have a soil analysis done?
8/13/2015 1:21:56 PM

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